Contents

 

Testamonials

Listen to Doug play

About Doug

Which series should I use?

Series/
rim size chart

Mouthpiece comparison charts

Tenor Trombone

Bass Trombone

Contrabass and Tuba

Options

How to order

Contact and 2018 Prices

Bass Trombone and Euphonium mouthpieces

EUPH series


Euphonium mouthpieces - also useful for tenor trombone players to double on bass trombone using their tenor rim size


These mouthpieces are sort of a cross between my tenor and bass trombone designs, with some aspects of each. The "interface" where the rim and cup meet is larger than the XT interface, and I use bass blanks because they need the larger outside to accommodate the larger inside and the threads. The end result is a more open feel and sound, that works very well on euphonium, and is just open enough to be a comfortable bass doubling mouthpiece for tenor players.
The rim shapes are identical to my tenor trombone rims, regular and narrow.
If your mouthpiece sits right at the bottom of your nose, get a narrow rim.

Rims:
EUPH 100 and N100 (25.4 mm) (these are not always available)
EUPH 101 and N101 (25.65 mm)
EUPH 102 and N102 (25.9 mm)
EUPH 103 and N103 (26.16 mm)
EUPH 104 and N104 (26.4mm)
EUPH 105 and N105 (26.67 mm)
EUPH 106 and N106 (26.92 mm)
Finishes available: S-silver, G-gold, L-Lexan (polycarbonate plastic)
Rim contours available: Standard, and N (narrow)

Cups: (a star after the letter indicates a new version started in December 2017)

EUPH G -  tenor depth, about like a 5G
EUPH H - shallower than a 51D or BB1, for more definition
EUPH I - similar in depth to a 51D or BB1, but with the EUPH series rim sizes
EUPH J - most popular in the EUPH series
EUPH K - a deeper cup for a darker sound

Small shanks: (for small shank euphoniums)
4 - most popular backbore for small shank euphonium
5 - larger backbore, more open, for a bigger sound

Medium euphonium shanks: (for some Besson, Willson, and others)
6E - for medium-shank euphoniums, E taper fits medium-shank Bessons and Willsons;
6Es - a slightly smaller taper to go in farther, works better for some older Bessons.  Similar fit to the Denis Wick euph shanks.

Large shanks: (for large shank euphoniums)
8 - standard large shank backbore
9 - larger backbore, for a bigger sound on larger euphoniums

Notes for ordering shanks: The letter on the shank must match the letter on the cup: for example, a standard large shank for a J cup is a J8. All shanks are intended to fit into the receiver 1".
 



SB series: Smaller Bass trombone rim sizes
and shallower cups for doubling on Tenor Trombone or Euphonium

Rims:
SB 105 (26.7 mm)
SB 106 similar to Bach 2G, Wick 2NAL (26.9 mm)
SB 107 (27.2 mm)
SB 108 similar to Bach 1.5G, Schilke 58 (27.4mm)
SB 110 a little smaller than Bach 1.25G, (27.9 mm)
Finishes available: S-silver, G-gold, L-Lexan (polycarbonate plastic)
Rim contours available: Standard (narrow), and Wide (tenor rim shape)

Cups: (a star after the letter indicates a new version started in December 2017)
SB C medium-shallow, for doubling on small bore trombones
SB E medium, for tenor doubling, about the depth of a Bach 6½AL
SB G medium-deep, best for doubling on large bore tenor or euphonium
SB I shallower than Bach 1.5G, for bright bass sound or tenor double
SB J similar to Bach 1.5G or Schilke 58, most popular in the SB series
SB K similar to Schilke 59, Bach 1.25G, a deep cup for these rim sizes.

Small shanks: (for small tenors, altos, and small shank euphoniums)
alto S - backbore for most Eb alto trombones, slightly smaller taper than tenor to go in farther
alto - backbore for Eb alto trombones with normal tenor taper
2 - backbore for .485 to .500 bore trombones
3 - backbore for .508 to .510 bore trombones
4 - backbore for .525 bore small shank trombones, and euphonium

Medium euphonium shanks: (for some Besson, Willson, and others)
6E - for all medium-shank euphoniums, E taper fits medium-shank Bessons and Willsons; others on request

Large shanks: (for large shank trombones and euphoniums)
8 - standard large shank backbore, best design for most trombones and euphoniums
9 - larger backbore, especially for dual-bore large shank trombones

Notes for ordering shanks: The letter on the shank must match the letter on the cup: for example, a standard large shank for a J cup is a J8. All shanks should fit into the receiver 1". Large (bass) shanks: Bach, new Conn, Edwards, Holton, Shires, and Yamaha tenor and bass trombones, and all large shank euphoniums, use the standard large shank. Older Conn and Blessing large tenor and bass trombones require a different taper - specify Conn shank for proper fit. King duo gravis, 7B, 8B, and Benge 290 can use standard, but sometimes need a specially tapered “K” shank for a better fit.

Professionals who use the SB series

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MB series: Medium Bass trombone rim sizes
in the size range of 1-1/2G to 1-1/4G

Rims:
MB 107 (27.2mm)

MB 108 similar to Bach 1.5G, Schilke 58 (27.4mm)
MB 109 a little bigger, no comparables (27.7mm)
MB 110 a little smaller than Bach 1.25G, (27.9 mm)
MB 111 
if you want this size it's better to use the LB series
MB 112 if you want this size it's better to use the LB series
Finishes available: S-silver, G-gold, L-Lexan (polycarbonate plastic)
Rim contours available: Standard only (fairly narrow, the same shape as the same number SB and LB rims)

Cups: (a star after the letter indicates a new version started in December 2017)
MB I a bit shallower than Bach 1.5G or Schilke 58

MB J similar to Bach 1.5G or Schilke 58, most popular in the MB series
MB K similar to Schilke 59, Bach 1.25G

MB L  deeper, almost like a 60 but with MB rim sizes

Large shanks: (for large shank trombones and euphoniums)
8 - standard large shank backbore, best design for most trombones and euphoniums
9 - larger backbore, especially for dual-bore large shank trombones
- for other shanks, see comparable SB and LB listings

 

LB series: Larger Bass Trombone rim sizes
and shallower cups for doubling on tenor trombone and euphonium

Rims:
LB 109 plays like a big 1.5G but with the larger feel of this series (27.7 mm)

LB 110 smaller than a Bach 1.25G, larger than a Bach 1.5G or Schilke 58 (28 mm)
LB 111 about like a Bach 1.25G (28.2mm)
LB 112 similar to Schilke 59, a little larger than Bach 1.25G (28.5mm)
LB 113 between 112 and 114 (28.7mm)
LB 114 copy of Schilke 60, similar size to some Bach 1G, but flatter (29mm)
LB 115 between 114 and 116 (29.2mm)
LB 116 larger than Schilke 60, same shape (29.5mm)
Finishes available: S-silver, G-gold, L-Lexan (polycarbonate plastic)
Rim contours available: Standard (narrow), mW-Medium-Wide and W-Wide

Cups: (a star after the letter indicates a new version started in December 2017)
LB C medium-shallow, for doubling on small bore trombones

LB D this is sometimes available
LB E medium, for tenor doubling, about the depth of a Bach 6.5AL
LB G medium-deep, best for doubling on large bore tenor or euphonium
LB I shallower than Bach 1.5G, for bright bass sound or tenor double
LB J similar to Bach 1.5G or Schilke 58
LB K excellent all-around medium bass trombone depth,
LB L almost as deep as Schilke 60 or Bach 1G, a lot easier to play
LB M plays like Schilke 60 or Bach 1G, but more core and easier high range
LB N deeper, but still centered, try it if Schilke 60 isn't deep enough for you!
LB P for doubling on contrabass or tuba, too deep to use on bass trombone

Small shanks: (for small tenors, altos, and small shank euphoniums)
alto S - backbore for most Eb alto trombones, slightly smaller taper than tenor to go in farther
alto - backbore for Eb alto trombones with normal tenor taper
2 - backbore for .485 to .500 bore trombones
3 - backbore for .508 to .510 bore trombones
4 - backbore for .525 bore small shank trombones, and euphonium

Medium euphonium shanks: (for some Besson, Willson, and others)
6E - for all medium-shank euphoniums, E taper fits medium-shank Bessons and Willsons; others on request

Large shanks: (for .547 tenors, bass trombones and all large shank euphoniums)
8 - standard large shank backbore, best design for most single-bore trombones
9 - larger backbore, especially good for dual-bore trombones, and euphoniums

10 - extra large backbore only available in L10 and M10

Notes for ordering shanks: The letter on the shank must match the letter on the cup: for example, a standard large shank for an L cup is an L8. All shanks should fit into the receiver 1". Large (bass) shanks: Bach, new Conn, Edwards, Holton, Shires, and Yamaha tenor and bass trombones, and all large shank euphoniums, use the standard large shank. Older Conn and Blessing large tenor and bass trombones require a different taper - specify Conn shank for proper fit. King duo gravis, 7B, 8B, and Benge 290 can use standard, but sometimes need a specially tapered “K” shank for a better fit.

 

XB series: eXtra Large Bass - Larger, Wider, and Heavier than the LB series

The XB Series is for players who prefer big mouthpieces like the 93D and 95D

XB THREADS ARE NOT COMPATIBLE WITH MY OTHER BASS RIMS AND CUPS

Rims: same shape as the LB series

XB 112 similar to Schilke 59, a little larger than Bach 1.25G, plays bigger (28.5mm)
XB 113 between 112 and 114 (28.7mm)
XB 114 copy of Schilke 60, similar size to some Bach 1G, but flatter (29mm)
XB 115 between 114 and 116 (29.2mm)
XB 116 larger than Schilke 60, same shape (29.5mm) 

XB 117 (29.7mm)

Rim contours available: Standard (narrow) and mW-Medium-Wide

 

Cups: (these cups may come in a variety of outside shapes and weights)

XB K excellent all-around medium bass trombone depth,
XB L almost as deep as Schilke 60 or Bach 1G, a lot easier to play
XB M plays like Schilke 60 or Bach 1G, but more core and easier high range
XB N deeper, but still centered, try it if Schilke 60 isn't deep enough for you!
XB P Not available yet, but probably will be

 

Large shanks:

Same backbores as the other bass mouthpieces, plus:

10 - an exta large backbore, so far only available in L10 and M10

 

Professionals who use the LB series

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